IGUAÇU FALLS

Iguaçu Falls are located between the Iguaçu National Park in the state of Paraná and the Iguazú National Park, Misiones, Argentina (both considered World Heritage Sites). Their Its name comes from the Guarani language and means big water.

The falls are formed by a set of 275 jumps up to 80m high, fed by the torrent of the Iguaçu River. Remember that the number of jumps varies depending on the river flow (this number ranges from 150 to 300). The heels are arranged in a shape reminiscent of a horseshoe, the total length of this “horseshoe” is 2700m (1900m in Argentina and 800m in Brazil). Among the most beautiful jumps is the Devil’s Throat (located in Argentine territory), whose height is 80m.

Indigenous Legend

About the formation of the Falls, there is an indigenous legend in which M’Boi, son of Tupã, creator God of all, was the God of waters. Flooding, lack of fish or polluted water was attributed to some kind of punishment from M’boi.
Behold, at one time many fish began to be lacking, so as not to be necessary the Indians made a deal with the giant snake, M’boi: each year one of the most beautiful Indians would be given to him as a payment for him to always give fish. and freshwater to the indigenous. M’boi accepted the offer, and it was a pride for the natives to be chosen to be the gift of the God of the waters.
Naipi, daughter of Igobi, the chief, was very beautiful and intelligent, so beautiful that the waters of Iguaçu stopped when the young girl looked at them. It was chosen to be offered to M’boi. Preparations for the delivery party began, they were all happy and the chief very proud of M’boi’s choice.
However the warrior Tarobá was enchanted by Naipi, and from there born a great love. They both knew it would be forbidden love because if M’boi found out all the agreement and respect for the ancestors would be broken, but they left everything behind for that very night to escape together.
When the day of the big party came, the village was adorned, prepared very “kaguiju” – typical fermented drink. Everyone drank a lot and at that moment Tarobá and Naipi saw the opportunity to escape. They took a small canoe and rowed down the river.
The movement of the waters awoke M’boi that realizing that his betrothed was running away with another man was seized by rage swam towards the two, who were almost to the Paraná River, where the water god was not allowed to go.
With fury, he lifted his huge body and dived violently downstream. Then a huge gap was opened where the fugitives disappear and the waters formed the Iguazu Falls.
The great Tupan God, furious with all the fighting and betrayal, decided to punish the three protagonists of this story, then turning Naipi into a large rock, Tarobá into a palm tree, and M’boi was forever imprisoned within the devil’s throat.
Legend has it that you can see the rock and the palm tree walking the trails of the falls.