BONDA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS

In times of New Granada, the Spanish government established a civil-military colony, in what is now Bonda, to protect the valuables that were in Santa Marta

The cities of the Tayrona, before the arrival of the Spanish, were made up of hundreds and sometimes thousands of homes. The communities were organized in circular houses with wooden structures, large temples and stone paved plazas. They were great engineers and made their buildings and structures according to the environment in which they lived; as well as built their towns in a climate of intense rainfall and steep mountains. A prime example of this architecture is seen at the Ciudad Perdida.

During the conquest, many indigenous cities were subjected to persecution and disappeared. Local people were grouped into parishes and Indian villages as a means to assert control over the people and their land; including the conversion to Catholicism and the assimilation to European customs.

In times of New Granada, the Spanish government established a civil-military colony, in what is now Bonda, to protect the valuables that were in Santa Marta. In this way, they avoided possible robbery by pirates and repelled and attacked other Indians in the region. Bonda was the first and only colony in the Sierra Nevada, but eventually ended up destroyed, leaving today only vestiges of that era.